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Politics
Chip Somodevilla / Getty / Katie Martin /The Atlantic

The Senate Puts Medicaid on the Chopping Block

A draft version of the AHCA released Thursday shows even deeper cuts to the program than the House version. Vann R. Newkirk II 1:16 PM ET
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

What's In the Senate Republican Health-Care Bill

Like the House version, Mitch McConnell’s proposal would slash taxes, cut Medicaid, and eliminate Obamacare’s insurance mandates for individuals and employers. Russell Berman 11:38 AM ET
Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Obama Offers the Defense of Obamacare He'd Never Given

The former president issued a warning about the American Health Care Act: “This bill will do you harm.” Vann R. Newkirk II 4:29 PM ET
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The Supreme Court Defends the Integrity of U.S. Citizenship

The justices unanimously limited the federal government’s power to strip immigrants of their hard-won status. Matt Ford 3:26 PM ET
Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Trump Is a Russian-Interference Truther Once More

On Twitter, the president claims vindication against claims of collusion and reverses his acknowledgement of Kremlin tampering with the election. David A. Graham 12:12 PM ET
Scott Morgan / Reuters

The Lasting Damage of Trump's 'Tapes' Bluff

The president’s attempt to intimidate James Comey didn’t merely backfire—it may also embolden hostile regimes to conclude his other threats are equally empty. David Frum 2:17 PM ET
Carlo Allegri / Reuters

Trump's Victory Sends a Disturbing Message to Women

A candidate who dismissed boasts of sexual assault as “locker room talk” will now serve as president. Clare Foran Nov 9, 2016
Ricardo Arduengo / AP

Testing Territorial Limits

A crop of court cases could change the relationship between the United States and its territories. Vann R. Newkirk II Mar 30, 2016
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hirty minutes.
That’s about how long it would take a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) launched from North Korea to reach Los Angeles. With the powers in Pyongyang working doggedly toward making this possible—building an ICBM and shrinking a nuke to fit on it—analysts now predict that Kim Jong Un will have the capability before Donald Trump completes one four-year term. About which the president has tweeted, simply, “It won’t happen!” Though given to reckless oaths, Trump is not in this case saying anything that departs significantly from the past half century of futile American policy toward North Korea. Preventing the Kim dynasty from having a nuclear device was an American priority long before Pyongyang exploded its first nuke, in 2006, during the administration of George W. Bush. The Kim regime detonated four more while Barack Obama was in the White House. In the more than four decades since Richard Nixon held office, the U.S. has tried to control North Korea by issuing threats, conducting military exercises, ratcheting up diplomatic sanctions, leaning on China, and most recently, it seems likely, committing cybersabotage. Continue Reading
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The Supreme Court Defends the Integrity of U.S. Citizenship

The justices unanimously limited the federal government’s power to strip immigrants of their hard-won status.
The U.S. Supreme Court narrowed the scope under which the federal government can strip naturalized Americans of their citizenship on Thursday, ruling that false statements made during the naturalization process had to be relevant to gaining citizenship in order to justify revoking it later. Justice Elena Kagan, writing for a unanimous Court in Maslenjuk v. United States, said that using small omissions or minor lies to denaturalize immigrants went beyond what Congress authorized. “The statute it passed, most naturally read, strips a person of citizenship not when she committed any illegal act during the naturalization process, but only when that act played some role in her naturalization,” she wrote.
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Jamie Chung

What’s Wrong With the Democrats?

If the party cares about winning, it needs to learn how to appeal to the white working class.
The strategy was simple
.
A demographic wave—long-building, still-building—would carry the party to victory, and liberalism to generational advantage. The wave was inevitable, unstoppable. It would not crest for many years, and in the meantime, there would be losses—losses in the midterms and in special elections; in statehouses and in districts and counties and municipalities outside major cities. Losses in places and elections where the white vote was especially strong. But the presidency could offset these losses. Every four years the wave would swell, receding again thereafter but coming back in the next presidential cycle, higher, higher. The strategy was simple. The presidency was everything.
Continue Reading
Justin Renteria

Power Causes Brain Damage

Over time, leaders lose mental capacities—most notably for reading other people—that were essential to their rise.
If power were
a prescription drug, it would come with a long list of known side effects. It can intoxicate. It can corrupt. It can even make Henry Kissinger believe that he’s sexually magnetic. But can it cause brain damage? When various lawmakers lit into John Stumpf at a congressional hearing last fall, each seemed to find a fresh way to flay the now-former CEO of Wells Fargo for failing to stop some 5,000 employees from setting up phony accounts for customers. But it was Stumpf’s performance that stood out. Here was a man who had risen to the top of the world’s most valuable bank, yet he seemed utterly unable to read a room. Although he apologized, he didn’t appear chastened or remorseful. Nor did he seem defiant or smug or even insincere. He looked disoriented, like a jet-lagged space traveler just arrived from Planet Stumpf, where deference to him is a natural law and 5,000 a commendably small number. Even the most direct barbs—“You have got to be kidding me” (Sean Duffy of Wisconsin); “I can’t believe some of what I’m hearing here” (Gregory Meeks of New York)—failed to shake him awake.
Continue Reading
Mike Blake / Reuters

The Paradox of American Restaurants

The quality and variety of food in the U.S. has never been better. The business seems to be struggling. What’s really going on?
For restaurants in America, it is the best of times, and it is the worst of times. Last century’s dystopians imagined that mediocre fast-food chains would take over every square inch of the country. But in cities across the U.S., residents are claiming that the local restaurant scene is in a golden age of variety and quality. I’ve heard it in Portland, Oregon, named the best food city in America by the Washington Post; in Washington, D.C., named the best food city in America by Bon Appetit; in New Orleans, where the number of restaurants grew 70 percent after Hurricane Katrina; and in San Francisco, which boasts the most restaurants per capita in the country; and in Chicago, which has added several three-Michelin-star restaurants this decade. I live in New York, which will always lead the country in sheer abundance of dining options, but after years of visiting my sister in Los Angeles, I’m thoroughly convinced that America’s culinary capital has switched coasts.
Continue Reading
Elaina Natario / Katie Martin / The Atlantic

Therapy for Everybody

In Appalachia, a primary-care clinic offers quick bursts of psychotherapy on the spot.
JOHNSON CITY, Tennessee—The first patient of the morning had been working 119 hours a week. Greta (not her real name) had been coming home late at night, skipping dinner, and crashing into bed. One recent night, her college-aged daughter melted down, telling an exhausted Greta that her parents’ marital tensions were putting a strain on her. “She’s like, ‘Why don’t you just divorce him?’” Greta recounted to her psychotherapist, Thomas Bishop, who was perched on a rolling stool in the bright examination room. “‘Why don’t you just do it and get it over with?’” Greta planned to stay with her husband, but her daughter’s outburst worried her. “Is this going to affect the way she feels about relationships?” she asked Bishop.
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Illustration by Lincoln Agnew*

How the Democrats Lost Their Way on Immigration

In the past decade, liberals have avoided inconvenient truths about the issue.
The myth, which liberals
like myself find tempting, is that only the right has changed. In June 2015, we tell ourselves, Donald Trump rode down his golden escalator and pretty soon nativism, long a feature of conservative politics, had engulfed it. But that’s not the full story. If the right has grown more nationalistic, the left has grown less so. A decade ago, liberals publicly questioned immigration in ways that would shock many progressives today. Listen to the audio version of this article:Download the Audm app for your iPhone to listen to more titles. In 2005, a left-leaning blogger wrote, “Illegal immigration wreaks havoc economically, socially, and culturally; makes a mockery of the rule of law; and is disgraceful just on basic fairness grounds alone.” In 2006, a liberal columnist wrote that “immigration reduces the wages of domestic workers who compete with immigrants” and that “the fiscal burden of low-wage immigrants is also pretty clear.” His conclusion: “We’ll need to reduce the inflow of low-skill immigrants.” That same year, a Democratic senator wrote, “When I see Mexican flags waved at proimmigration demonstrations, I sometimes feel a flush of patriotic resentment. When I’m forced to use a translator to communicate with the guy fixing my car, I feel a certain frustration.”
Continue Reading
Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Obama: 'This Bill Will Do You Harm'

The former president issued a warning about the Republican plan to replace his signature health-care law. The Senate is planning to vote on it as early as next week. Vann R. Newkirk II 4:29 PM ET Supreme Court J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The Supreme Court Defends the Integrity of U.S. Citizenship

The justices unanimously limited the federal government’s power to strip immigrants of their hard-won status. Matt Ford 3:26 PM ET Scott Morgan / Reuters

The Lasting Damage of Trump's 'Tapes' Bluff

The president’s attempt to intimidate James Comey didn’t merely backfire—it may also embolden hostile regimes to conclude his other threats are equally empty. David Frum 2:17 PM ET Newsletter J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Old McConnell Has a Plan

Senate Republicans released a 142-page proposal that would dismantle parts of the Affordable Care Act.

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Scott Morgan / Reuters

Trump: There Are (Probably) No Tapes

The president admits he never had any recordings of conversations with James Comey, but his idle threat has already set off a catastrophic chain reaction. David A. Graham 1:52 PM ET Business Courtesy of Stacey Abrams

Finding Mentorship Outside of Your Industry

Stacey Abrams has made a career for herself in politics, but that’s not where she looks for guidance. Elisha Brown 1:46 PM ET Health Chip Somodevilla / Getty / Katie Martin /The ...

The Senate Puts Medicaid on the Chopping Block

A draft version of the AHCA released Thursday shows even deeper cuts to the program than the House version. Vann R. Newkirk II 1:16 PM ET
Writers
Russell Berman
The Perilous Path Ahead for the Senate Health-Care Bill
6:05 PM ET
Vann R. Newkirk II
Obama: 'This Bill Will Do You Harm'
4:29 PM ET
Matt Ford
The Supreme Court Defends the Integrity of U.S. Citizenship
3:26 PM ET
David Frum
The Lasting Damage of Trump's 'Tapes' Bluff
2:17 PM ET
David A. Graham
Trump: There Are (Probably) No Tapes
1:52 PM ET
All Writers
Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Trump Is a Russian-Interference Truther Once More

On Twitter, the president claims vindication against claims of collusion and reverses his acknowledgement of Kremlin tampering with the election. David A. Graham 12:12 PM ET Congress J. Scott Applewhite / AP

What's in the Senate Republican Health-Care Bill

Like the House version, Mitch McConnell’s proposal would slash taxes, cut Medicaid, and eliminate Obamacare’s insurance mandates for individuals and employers. Russell Berman 11:38 AM ET Congress Aaron Bernstein / Reuters

Congress Heads for a Showdown on Obamacare

The clock, as they say, is ticking. Fast. Michelle Cottle 6:00 AM ET Evan Vucci / AP

Trump’s Immigration Allies Are Growing Frustrated With Him

The president was supposed to be their champion, but he’s failed to act on some of his key campaign promises. Priscilla Alvarez 6:00 AM ET Congress J. Scott Applewhite / AP / Katie Martin ...

'We're Amending Obamacare. We're Not Killing It'

The Senate bill coming out Thursday would do many things to health care in the U.S., but it won’t get rid of the Affordable Care Act, and Mitch McConnell won’t claim that it does. Russell Berman 6:00 AM ET The Presence of Justice J. Scott Applewhite / AP

The Supreme Court Tinkers at the Edges of the Machinery of Death

Opponents of the practice won a series of notable cases at the U.S. Supreme Court this term, even as total victory in their war against the death penalty moved further out of reach. Matt Ford 4:50 AM ET Politics Daily Aaron P. Bernstein / Reuters

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Now, Without Further AHCAdo

Senate Republicans are expected to unveil their health-care proposal on Thursday. Elaine Godfrey Jun 21, 2017 David Goldman / AP

What Democrats' Defeat in Georgia Means—and Doesn't

The party’s recent special-election losses aren’t necessarily a bad omen for 2018. But they show how Democrats need better answers to the GOP’s most effective arguments. Ronald Brownstein Jun 21, 2017 The Presence of Justice Reuters

Do African Americans Have a Right to Bear Arms?

And if so, why won’t the justice system or the NRA stand up for it? David A. Graham Jun 21, 2017 Aaron Bernstein / Reuters

How Drug Prohibition Fuels American Carnage

Attorney General Jeff Sessions appears not to understand the most basic cost of the drug policy he recommends: the guarantee of violent crime. Conor Friedersdorf Jun 21, 2017 Global Joshua Roberts / Reuters

Is American Democracy Really Under Threat?

The country’s turbulent politics, in perspective Uri Friedman Jun 21, 2017 Christopher Aluka Berry / Reuters

Why Ossoff Lost

Despite the opposition Trump has galvanized, the Democrats still haven’t figured out how to win in the places where they’re trying to stage a comeback. Molly Ball Jun 21, 2017 Congress Joshua Roberts / Reuters

Trump’s Most Lasting Legacy?

America’s courts—presently a thorn in the president’s side—are about to get a lot more conservative. And they will probably stay that way for a very long time. Alex Wagner Jun 21, 2017 All Coverage
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